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Modern Day Malaise

Symptoms of adrenal fatigue:

Morning fatigue — You don’t really seem to “wake up” until 10 a.m.(& you are not a teenager), even if you’ve been awake since 7 a.m.
Afternoon “low” (feelings of sleepiness or clouded thinking) from 2 to 4 p.m.
Burst of energy at 6 p.m. — You finally feel better from your afternoon lull.
Sleepiness at 9 to 10 p.m. — However, you resist going to sleep.
“Second wind” at 11 p.m. that lasts until about 1 a.m., when you finally go to sleep.
Cravings for foods high in salt and fat
Increased PMS or menopausal symptoms
Mild depression
Lack of energy
Decreased ability to handle stress
Muscular weakness
Increased allergies
Lightheadedness when getting up from a sitting or laying down position
Decreased sex drive
Frequent sighing
Inability to handle foods high in potassium or carbohydrates unless they’re combined with fats and protein.

(The above symptoms also ties in with Ayurvedic philosophy, where the above profiles Pitta Dosha.)
Adrenal glands are small and located on the tops of your kidneys. Proper diet and yoga poses that promote kidney health can save you from this 21st century malaise – Here are top 15 good for your kidneys foods according to yourkidneys.com. Good site to refer to to give TLC to your kidneys. Our kidneys’ health rules our general health:

1. Red bell peppers

Red bell peppers are a good choice for those concerned about kidney health.
Adequate intake of potassium is 4,700 mg per day. One cup of chopped, uncooked, red bell peppers provides 314 mg of potassium. The combination of low sodium and high potassium found in red bell peppers makes them a healthy choice for hypertension. Packed with generous portion of vitamins A, C, B6, folic acid and fiber. They also contain the antioxidant lycopene, which protects against certain types of cancer.

2. Cabbage

Crunchy cabbage is a cruciferous vegetable filled with phytochemicals, chemical compounds found in certain fruits and vegetables. Phytochemicals work to break apart free radicals. Many phytochemicals are believed to combat cancer and support cardiovascular health.

Inexpensive cabbage is a great addition to your eating plan, because it’s also high in vitamins K and C, high in fiber and a good source of vitamin B6 and folic acid, yet it’s low in potassium, so it’s especially kidney-friendly.

3. Cauliflower

Another kidney-friendly super food is cauliflower. This cruciferous vegetable brings lots of vitamin C to your plate, along with folate and fiber. In addition it contains compounds that help your liver neutralize toxic substances.

Cauliflower can be eaten raw with dip or in salads. Steamed or boiled, it can be seasoned and turned into a great side dish. You can even mash cauliflower as a replacement for mashed potatoes.

4. Garlic

Garlic is good for reducing inflammation and lowering cholesterol. It also has antioxidant and anti-clotting properties. (Cooking garlic will not affect its antioxidant properties, but it will reduce its anti-clotting and anti-inflammatory effects.)

Use garlic powder instead of garlic salt to add extra flavor to your meals without adding extra sodium.
5. Onion

Another popular food used for seasoning is the onion. Onion is full of flavonoids, particularly quercetin. Flavonoids are natural chemicals that prevent the deposit of fatty material in blood vessels and add pigmentation (color) to plants. Quercetin is a powerful antioxidant that is believed to help reduce heart disease and protect against many forms of cancer. It also has anti-inflammatory properties.

Low in potassium, onions are not only kidney-friendly; they also contain chromium, a mineral that assists your body with the metabolism of fats, proteins and carbohydrates.

6. Apples

An apple a day really does help keep the doctor away! High in fiber and anti-inflammatory properties, apples help reduce cholesterol, prevent constipation, protect against heart disease and decrease your risk of cancer. Renal-friendly apples can be eaten raw or cooked. Best avoid juices and ciders for the high sugar content.

7. Cranberries

Cranberries are great for preventing urinary tract infections, because they make urine more acidic and help keep bacteria from attaching to the inside of the bladder. They’ve also been shown to protect against cancer and heart disease.

Although we think of cranberries as a holiday side dish, cranberry juice can be enjoyed daily for added nutrition. Or toss a handful of dried cranberries into your cereal or salad.

8. Blueberries

These tasty berries get their blue color from antioxidant compounds called anthocyanidins. Blueberries get high marks for nutrition, thanks to natural compounds that reduce inflammation and lots of vitamin C and fiber. They also contain manganese, which contributes to healthy bones.

Use blueberries to top off your morning cereal, whip them up in a fruit smoothie or enjoy them in a baked treat, such as muffins or crisp.

9. Raspberries

Raspberries contain a compound called ellagic acid, which helps neutralize free radicals. The berry’s red color comes from antioxidants called anthocyanins. Raspberries are packed with fiber, vitamin C and manganese. They also have plenty of folate, a B vitamin. Raspberries have properties that help stop cancer cell growth and the formation of tumors.

Sprinkle fresh raspberries on cereal, or whip them up in a kidney-friendly fruit smoothie.

10. Strawberries

Strawberries are rich in two types of antioxidants, plus they contain lots of vitamin C, manganese and fiber. They have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties and also help keep your heart healthy.

Like most berries, they’re wonderful on cereal or in smoothies. Add whipped topping for a quick dessert, or puree them for a fresh addition to pound or angel food cake.

11. Cherries

Cherries are filled with antioxidants and phytochemicals that protect your heart. When eaten daily, they have been shown to reduce inflammation.

Fresh cherries make a delicious snack. Of course, cherry pie is a popular dessert, but there’s also cherry crisp, cherry cheesecake and even cherry coffee cake. Cherry sauce makes a nice accompaniment to lamb or pork.

12. Red grapes

The color in red grapes comes from several flavonoids. These are good for your heart, because they prevent oxidation and reduce the chance of blood clots. One flavonoid in grapes, resveratrol, may boost production of nitric oxide, which increases muscle relaxation in blood vessels for better blood flow. Flavonoids also help protect you from cancer and prevent inflammation.

Choose those with red or purple skin grapes for the highest flavonoid content. Eat grapes as a snack. When frozen, they make a good thirst-quencher for those on a fluid-restricted diet. Add grapes to fruit or chicken salad. Or drink grape juice but again, high sugar content so there’s a trade-off here.

13. Egg whites

Did you know that egg whites are pure protein? They provide the highest quality protein there is, along with all of the essential amino acids. If you’re on the kidney diet, it’s good to note that egg whites have less phosphorus than other protein sources, such as egg yolks or meats.

Use egg whites for omelets or egg white sandwiches. You can also add them to smoothies or shakes. Hard boil eggs and use the whites to use in tuna or green salads.

14. Fish

Another high-quality source of protein is fish. Both the American Diabetes Association and the American Heart Association recommend that you include fish in your meal plan two or three times a week. Besides being a great source of protein, fish contains anti-inflammatory fats called omega-3s. These healthy fats help prevent diseases, such as cancer and heart disease. They also help lower LDL (the bad cholesterol) and raise HDL (the good cholesterol). Salmon is great but explore other kinds of fish

15. Olive oil

Research has shown that people in countries where olive oil is used instead of other types of oils tend to have lower rates of cancer and heart disease. This is believed to be due to olive oil’s many good components: oleic acid, an anti-inflammatory fatty acid which protects against oxidation and polyphenols and antioxidant compounds that prevent inflammation and oxidation.

Use virgin or extra virgin olive oil – they’re higher in antioxidants. Olive oil can be used in cooking or to make salad dressing, as a dip for bread and as a marinade for vegetables.

When buying fruits and vegetables, get the freshest ones you can find (which means local) and be sure to include a variety (rainbow colors), since some are rich in one nutrient and others are rich in another, no supplement can replace “real” complex nutrients in “real” foods. Rich in variety and deep colors were always sought out by my late grandmother. She lived well into her late eighties and enjoyed turning a portion of her Hayama garden into a vegetable garden, taking great pride in the eggplants, bell peppers, cucumbers, green beans and tomatoes she harvested. In spring, she would make Plum wine and plum pickles from the plum tree in the garden. Nothing like vine ripened veggies and fruits to feel the bounty of nature and feel the gratitude growing within us.

Smile:)

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50 Benefits of Coconut

I managed to list 50 benefits of coconuts on my Japanese blog. 50? (list of 50 brings to mind ’50 ways to leave your lover’ by Paul Simon…uh, oh, that song has to drone in my head now.) Here are some summarized from Coconut Research Center site (yes, there’s one). A bit miffed as it does not narrow down if we are talking about coconut water or coconut oil or ? and how but… Anyway, proven or not, I am not sure, but if even some of these claims are true, no wonder coconut consumption is widespread. Summer is almost here. Why not raise our glass coconut with a straw popped in – to the sun – add a wedge of pineapple and you’ve got yourself a natural virgin pina colada cocktail – so refreshing after working up a sweat!
Can of Coconut Juice
Kills viruses that cause influenza, herpes, measles, hepatitis C, SARS, AIDS, and other illnesses.
Kills bacteria that cause ulcers, throat infections, urinary tract infections, gum disease and cavities, pneumonia, and gonorrhea, and other diseases.
Kills fungi and yeasts that cause candidiasis, ringworm, athlete’s foot, thrush, diaper rash, and other infections.
Expels or kills tapeworms, lice, giardia, and other parasites.
Provides a nutritional source of quick energy.
Boosts energy and endurance, enhancing physical and athletic performance.
Improves digestion and absorption of other nutrients including vitamins, minerals, and amino acids.
Improves insulin secretion and utilization of blood glucose.
Relieves stress on pancreas and enzyme systems of the body.
Reduces symptoms associated with pancreatitis.
Helps relieve symptoms and reduce health risks associated with diabetes.
Reduces problems associated with malabsorption syndrome and cystic fibrosis.
Improves calcium and magnesium absorption and supports the development of strong bones and teeth.
Helps protect against osteoporosis.
Helps relieve symptoms associated with gallbladder disease.
Relieves symptoms associated with Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and stomach ulcers.
Improves digestion and bowel function.
Relieves pain and irritation caused by hemorrhoids.
Reduces inflammation.
Supports tissue healing and repair.
Supports and aids immune system function.
Helps protect the body from breast, colon, and other cancers.
Is heart healthy; improves cholesterol ratio reducing risk of heart disease.
Protects arteries from injury that causes atherosclerosis and thus protects against heart disease.
Helps prevent periodontal disease and tooth decay.
Functions as a protective antioxidant.
Helps to protect the body from harmful free radicals that promote premature aging and degenerative disease.
Does not deplete the body’s antioxidant reserves like other oils do.
Improves utilization of essential fatty acids and protects them from oxidation.
Helps relieve symptoms associated with chronic fatigue syndrome.
Relieves symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (prostate enlargement).
Reduces epileptic seizures.
Helps protect against kidney disease and bladder infections.
Dissolves kidney stones.
Helps prevent liver disease.
Is lower in calories than all other fats.
Supports thyroid function.
Promotes loss of excess weight by increasing metabolic rate.
Is utilized by the body to produce energy in preference to being stored as body fat like other dietary fats.
Helps prevent obesity and overweight problems.
Applied topically helps to form a chemical barrier on the skin to ward off infection.
Reduces symptoms associated the psoriasis, eczema, and dermatitis.
Supports the natural chemical balance of the skin.
Softens skin and helps relieve dryness and flaking.
Prevents wrinkles, sagging skin, and age spots.
Promotes healthy looking hair and complexion.
Provides protection from damaging effects of ultraviolet radiation from the sun.
Helps control dandruff.
Does not form harmful by-products when heated to normal cooking temperature like other vegetable oils do.
Has no harmful or discomforting side effects.
Is completely non-toxic to humans.

(I did not make these up – an excerpt from Coconut Research Center)


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Catch the waves…

You can’t stop the waves, but you can learn to surf.
Jon Kabat-Zinn